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In Between Dreams

For Iman Verjee’s novel about family secrets and misguided love, the glow-in-the-dark stars in protagonist France’s bedroom serve as a symbol of innocence lost. The eagled eyed will pick out the constellation of Andromeda, the ‘chained princess’.

Oneworld Publishing

In Between Dreams Iman Verjee
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Creeps

I really enjoyed reading this YA title about that kid who’s bullied and belittled in high school. The idea was to evoke the sting of a slushy snowball (and allude to the threat of yellow snow); the snow’s been wiped away to reveal the title.

Art Director: Lisa Jager
Razorbill

Creeps
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What Do You Buy The Children of the Terrorist Who Tried to Kill Your Wife?

Two big challenges with this memoir by David Harris-Gershon. One, the exceedingly long title, and two, the subject matter. The fragmented treatment works to both slow down the reader, and to communicate the terrible impact of an attack on a loved one without being sensational.

Oneworld Publishing

What Do You Buy...
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The Hundred Hearts

Is there such a thing as obliquely literal? In this book by William Kowalski, the protagonist’s grandmother crafted cute, hand painted red balsawood hearts that she gave away. If you count the hearts on this cover, there certainly are a hundred. The stencilled, spray painted treatment is meant to evoke the main character’s military stint, and the five black hearts represent the five ‘kills’ he had during active duty.

Thomas Allen Publishers

William Kowalski
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I’ll Seize the Day Tomorrow

Having moved to Toronto from Montreal around this time last year, it was a double pleasure to work on this cover for Montreal writer and radio personality Jonathan Goldstein’s collection of dry essays. End papers match in Pantone process cheese colour. Spot gloss on the wrapper.

Art director: Lisa Jager
Penguin Canada 

Jonathan Goldstein I'll Sieze the Day Tomorrow
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Understanding the Essay

The first comps felt to the authors to be more about writing rather than understanding, and they wanted something that conveyed the range of topics and cleverness of the essay. The text on the origami animals is from Swift’s ‘A Modest Proposal’.

Foster & Porter, "Undestanding the Essay"
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The Slumbering Masses

For this cover about ‘sleep, medicine, and modern american life’, the pillow case was printed with the title and photographed. The editor liked the case so much she wanted to keep it once the job was done.

Rachel Moeller, Art Director
University of Minnesota Press 

Matthew J. Wolf-Meyer, "The Slumbering Masses"
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Death Sentences

A Japanese sci-fi/horror novel about a mysterious poem that kills its readers. The story begins with a Tokyo police investigation into the illegal copying and circulation of the poem, and ends in the distant future with an insurrection on Mars. Philip K. Dick would have loved this book.

University of Minnesota Press

Death Sentences